Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Elaine Justin / Pinky

Copyright Robert Capa, Magnum Photos. Taken May, 1944 in Royal London Hospital the day after a nighttime party sponsored by Endre (Robert). My guess is with a Roloflex. I couldn't find a picture online of Ms. Justin anywhere, so I thought I'd add this one since I assume I'm not the only one searching. I highly recommend the book, "Robert Capa, The Paris Years, 1933-1954" by Bernard Lebrun and Michel Lefebvre. Tremendous resource and very well done. I guess somebody might be searching for a pic of Papa's backside, so there's that too.

Naturally, no sooner do I post this pic than I find an article that includes the same photo. You have to view several serial photos (and a couple of ads) before you get to it but it was there all along, sigh.


2 comments:

  1. Elaine Justin is my great Aunt! A book about her life is being released soon. Happy to send you over more info!

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    1. Elaine Justin had an infectious sense of humor and a superb figure; she was twenty-five years old, and was looking for romance. Her marriage to John Justin, a handsome RAF pilot, was already over, or so she later claimed. Struck by her beautiful hair, Capa was soon calling her “Pinky” and ladling on the charm. At one point during his stay, Capa was awoken from a nap to find Pinky standing beside a gramophone in the living room, wearing a tight black dress.As they danced the rumba and drank champagne, she quickly succumbed to his charms; she would later say she fell in love with him that very weekend. for the rest of the war, whenever he returned to london, she would be waiting for him, often with a chilled bottle of champagne and the keys to a london penthouse where they would make intense love.

      A spring evening in 1943; dressed in a specially tailored correspondent’s uniform, Capa downed a last bottle of champagne and then kissed a teaful Pinky goodbye at Euston station. Pinky san a few lines from her favorite song, “J’Attendrai’ and then Capa stepped aboard the 7.30 pm train to glasgow, where he would join a troopship bound for north africa.
      Credit:
      “Blood and Champagne, The Life and Times of Robert Capa” by Alex Kershaw

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